Peter Monta

I’ve always preferred dark humour and it doesn’t get much blacker than this. There is no British faction whose views could dominate in Parliament and none which the EU would entertain for a nanosecond. Mind you this gives May plenty of job security since everybody on the train can see the wreck coming and no one in their right mind wants to become the engineer.

It reminds me of the punch line of an old joke about a team of long haul truckers, David and Boris, being interviewed separately for a job. David answers all the questions correctly and is finally given a hypothetical situation. You are careening down the side of a mountain, your brakes have failed, and the narrow bridge ahead is blocked by truck full of explosives, what do you do? David thinks about it for a bit and says, I’d wake up Boris! Why would you do that they ask him? Because we have been driving long haul together for thirty years and he’s never seen a wreck like the one we’re about to have.

Posted on 7/9/18 | 11:58 PM CEST

Tony Brown

Why does this site and commentators use the word hard line brextiteers?

They merely want to implement the results of the referendum and to implement the Tory election manifesto on which every single one of them was elected. Since when iis it being hard line to carry out your promises to the electorate and your party?

Posted on 7/9/18 | 11:58 PM CEST

Peter Monta

Oh I don’t Tony. Originally it was Brexiters and the opponents were accorded the name Remoaners. Late in the game the Brexiters tried to change it to Brexiteers as if that connoted swashbuckler privateers or hardy mountaineers. but all it ever reminded me of was Mickey Mouseketeers. I stick with Brexiters.

You are confused though if you think all Brexiters want the same thing. It might have been helpful if they didn’t try to define what it would be until after they voted on it. If they do have a commonality it would be that there is sacrifice that they are not willing to have someone else make to get whatever Brexit they imagine would be good.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 12:09 AM CEST

Max Hall

“Jeremy Hunt, a minister who has held the notoriously challenging health portfolio in government longer than anyone else in modern U.K. history.” – Because the Tory party is pathetically weak and self-serving. He was an atrocious health minister, probably the worst in living memory. Yet somehow he manages to hold on.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 12:11 AM CEST

François P

“She failed to prepare for no deal and she allowed the entire thing to be pushed through the prism of Northern Ireland. ”

I don’t think this happened by accident. I believe that May understood early on that ‘no deal’ would be catastrophic for the UK. Therefore, she decided to make that option impossible by not even trying to prepare for it. And she pushed the entire thing through the prism of NI because that allowed her to land her government exactly where she wanted, namely a soft Brexit.

The next few days or weeks will tell us whether she has succeeded or not. Anyway, I find the Politico headline completely stupid, as so often. I think she will emerge out of all this either as a prime minister clearly in charge, or out of her job.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 12:42 AM CEST

Stiv Ocssor

No Prime Minister is better than a bad one. Betraying 17.4 million voters and colluding with Merkel on the white paper before cabinet ministers was a step to far.
Now she is begging Labour MPs to help her get it through.
The Conservative Party are having a serious Gerald Ratner moment and hemorrhaging voters. On ConHome even the Tory activists are refusing to campaign for her.
Theresa May is quickly turning into Jeremy Corbyn’s only hope.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 1:03 AM CEST

EU doublestandards

May and Corbyn deserve each other. They’re both so pathetically weak. As usual if the British public want anything done properly, we’ll just have to do it ourselves. Our so-called leaders a too busy squabbling amongst themselves to deal with the real enemy.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 1:15 AM CEST

Stiv Ocssor

Rumor has it that the 1922 committee already have the 48 names required to trigger a Leadership Challenge, I think the writing is clearly on the wall.
The Conservative Membership’s confidence in May has plummeted. In fact she’d have to marry Verhofstadt for confidence to plummet to a lower level.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 1:39 AM CEST

Henry Jones

Don’t let Project Fear win. Hard Brexit is destiny!

Posted on 7/10/18 | 1:51 AM CEST

Alan Vanneman

Just to be picky, Blenheim is not Winston Churchill’s “ancestral home”, although he was born there. Blenheim is the home of the Dukes of Marlborough. Winston’s father, Lord Randolph Churchill, was the third son of the 7th Duke, and did not inherit the title, so Blenheim did not belong to him or Winston. As for “poor” Theresa May, she was given an impossible task (“No Poles and lots of money for national health!”) and she’s done about as well as could have been expected. As a Yank I could laugh, except Donald is ten times worse than Theresa.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:24 AM CEST

Grazyna Krakowska

The Brexit referendum isn’t legally binding under British law, and it was only an advisory vote. If May loses her premiership, there is no guarantee that the Brexit process will continue.

I don’t believe a Labour government would continue the process.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 5:22 AM CEST

Hal Owen

@stiv ocssor

“The Conservative Membership’s confidence in May has plummeted. In fact she’d have to marry Verhofstadt for confidence to plummet to a lower level.”

Very good, I like that. Two of the most odious people you could imagine. They deserve each other.

I wouldn’t worry too much about the conservative memberships confidence n May dropping like a stone. The first poll shows 64% of the population have no confidence in her being able to deliver an effective Brexit. As it stands, although her new plans have zero chance of being accepted, she has made the Tories a party of dead men and women walking. No-one wants the deal she has come up with. You only have to look at the reaction. Everyone knows she has done a U-turn and has betrayed the democratic vote and her own manifesto. Somewhere along the line, she will pay the price.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 6:23 AM CEST

-> tpk

@Hal Owen
This was not an U-turn. If you read carefully what e. g. Politico and Times reported since October what happened inside No10 May was driving this route straight.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 6:46 AM CEST

Nathan Kennedy

Stick a fork in her, she’s done.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 7:41 AM CEST

Eurobob *

From the tone of some of these comments, it is clear that Brexiteers are realising the game is up. The not-too-bothered-either-way population is getting mighty tired of your pompous and expensive daydreams. Sheer incompetence and lack of intellect has finished your side off. If you had been smart, you would have delayed starting the Article 50 clock, but you insisted, thereby forcing a crisis you were not prepared for. It smacks of rank desperation and incompetence.

In the end though, it will work out. Britain will now take a back seat on the world stage for a generation or more and our ridiculous presumption of world leadership will be abandoned. Which is what you wanted, isn’t it?

Posted on 7/10/18 | 7:51 AM CEST

EU doublestandards

@Eurobob

You’re clearly not British, or A: you’d know most people are far from ‘not too bothered’ and B: no Brit dreams of ‘world leadership’ and we haven’t done so for a very long time. Take your stereotypes and shove ’em.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 8:57 AM CEST

Steuersklav Erei

May’s best hope is that the EU rejects her offer before the Tory party can mount a leadership challenge.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 9:07 AM CEST

x yc

Steuersklav Erei – Re “May’s best hope is that the EU rejects her offer before the Tory party can mount a leadership challenge.”

That will be Friday or Monday, if the white paper is indeed published Thursday as promised and not delayed further again.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 9:57 AM CEST

X KM

she is still the PM?
If TM plan is the best negotiation card the Brexit side has to play (which clearly is, as no one has moved against her yet), then I feel sorry for them as their alternative Brexit negotiation cards shall be really pittiful.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 10:35 AM CEST

François P

It increasingly appears that there will be no leadership challenge. May remains in the saddle in a far stronger position.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 11:55 AM CEST

lib crit

the UK is a laughing stock

Posted on 7/10/18 | 12:53 PM CEST

lib crit

Forget Theresa May.
Brexitland is a zombie-nation going nowhere…

Posted on 7/10/18 | 1:55 PM CEST

Donal O'Brien

Att Politici

From THIALAND

All 12 Boy’s + Coach Out and Safe
BBC REPORTING

GREAT GREAT NEWS

CONGRATULATIONS to all in THAILAND

Donal O’Brien

Posted on 7/10/18 | 2:03 PM CEST

blue bell

@Stiv Ocssor
“Rumor has it that the 1922 committee already have the 48 names required to trigger a Leadership Challenge, I think the writing is clearly on the wall.
The Conservative Membership’s confidence in May has plummeted. In fact she’d have to marry Verhofstadt for confidence to plummet to a lower level”

Stiv the problem is that although they could raise the 48 votes needed to trigger a challenge to Mrs May they cannot be sure of raising the 159 needed at the next stage (there are currently 316 Conservative mps). The implications of challenging and not getting the 159 votes are clear.
* Parliamentary rules dictate that if a leadership challenge is unsuccessful it cannot be raised again for 12 months! *

JRM made it clear yesterday the ERG would be focusing their efforts towards trying to defeat the deal when it comes before parliament. He did not state that explicitly but he mentioned October or the beginning of November which is when that Bill is almost certainly to be scheduled to come before the House.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 2:50 PM CEST

blue bell

@Donal O’Brien
Wonderful news Donal. Miracles really do still happen.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 2:54 PM CEST

Peter Monta

I mostly agree with you Eurobob. Where I differ is that I see not a desire to play a world leader so much as a sidekick. Robin to America’s Batman as it were. Unfortunately Trump has no need nor desire for a sidekick on to whom to reflect glory. And Macron is way more attractive than May or Merkel. With Trump that is pretty much all that matters.

Still you are very right in your assessment that the jig is well and truly up for the Brexiters. May has not surrendered nearly enough for the EU and it is obvious they have no more cards to play. If the hard core Brexiters thought there was even the slightest possibility of getting something better they would be in open revolt and trying to seize power instead of just slinking off. So they are slinking.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 3:07 PM CEST

Donal O'Brien

Att Blue Bell

Dear Blue

Hi yes like everyone World Wide
DELIGHTED

A MIRACLE AS YOU SAY
Gives one, some hope for Humanity
Say no More

Regardd

Cheers for Brexit
Allways
Donal O’Brien

Posted on 7/10/18 | 3:12 PM CEST

blue bell

@Steuersklav Erei
“May’s best hope is that the EU rejects her offer before the Tory party can mount a leadership challenge.”

I have a feeling the last few days were just an orchestrated display purely for public consumption.

Do you recall the recent Politico article saying the EU would take it as a sign that Mrs May is serious if she were to dispose of a couple of the leave element in her cabinet (and who do you think their first choice of candidates would have been?)

You may recall another article by Politico last week where Mrs May supposedly told the EU they must get serious.

This morning I watched a short interview with Mairead McGuinness who said what Mrs May will put to the EU is just a proposal and that there will be some give and take on both sides.

I am left with the feeling that both sides have now concluded a deal MUST be done and they will make it happen. I think the big money men (or, as I refer to them, ‘Davos Divas’ ) have had a stern word in the ear of both sides.

Steu as things stand at the moment the Tory remainers have the upper hand. See my post to Stiv as to why a leadership challenge is not on the cards for the moment.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 3:13 PM CEST

Peter Monta

I have to say that Blue Bell’s analysis is nearly spot on. The only difference I have is that the Davos Divas, as she calls them, have mostly been on the British side. Their warnings on the consequences of a hard Brexit have been clear and concise. The result is not going to be give and take so much as the EU taking. They will not, for example, agree to any mutual set of trade rules that can only be changed with the permission of the UK or adjudicated in British courts. There will be no British veto on EU regulations and, post Brexit, no British say in what those rules might be. If Britain objects to EU intrusions into their affairs they can hardly expect to negotiate the reverse.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 3:34 PM CEST

-> tpk

@François P

“I don’t think this happened by accident. I believe that May understood early on that ‘no deal’ would be catastrophic for the UK. Therefore, she decided to make that option impossible by not even trying to prepare for it. And she pushed the entire thing through the prism of NI because that allowed her to land her government exactly where she wanted, namely a soft Brexit.”

That’s one of the many funny and truely amazing aspects of Brexit and one of the main errors Brexiteers made. They projected the problem with Ireland on EU and thereby oversaw that their true enemy sat in London. By not discussing of how they would be ready to ‘sacrifice’ or solve Ireland for Brexit in one or the other way they lost control of it. And that’s because most of them were not capable of even understanding the problem, neither in the forums nor in Parliament.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:00 PM CEST

Donal O'Brien

Att Comment

Read a piece this morning

MAY
She will be held in contempt by both
Leavers @ Remainers.

Brexit is betrayed, voters vilified and DEMOCRACY dismissed

You know what amazes me about BREXIT
Its not just about the FREEDOM for BRITAIN its For the FREEDOM of the PEOPLE of EUROPE

Have they any idea of the POWER’S that have been but in PLACE

Have they any idea of the Laws @
Regulations allready agreed, without Debate To be but in PLACE

And THEY the PAYMASTERS

Where’s the LOGIC

Cheers for Brexit
Allways
Donal O’Brien

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:01 PM CEST

Irene Duym

Well, Cameron should be held responsible and handle the hurdle: as a coward, he decided to resign instead and leave the mess for others to deal with.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:04 PM CEST

blue bell

@Peter Monta

“I have to say that Blue Bell’s analysis is nearly spot on. The only difference I have is that the Davos Divas, as she calls them, have mostly been on the British side. Their warnings on the consequences of a hard Brexit have been clear and concise. ”

Peter we have a misunderstanding I think. In your post you refer to the warnings having been addressed mostly to the Brits ( I assume you are referring to the CEOs of large international organisations) I am at fault for not ever explaining what precisely I meant by ‘Davos Divas’ .

I shall begin by describing who are not the real Divas:
the CEOs of international organisations, the world’s bankers, hedge fund managers, etc. who are merely the minions for the real money men.

The real money men are for the most part completely unknown to you and I as they shun the limelight. They are never mentioned in the press with the exception of one or two peripheral figures perhaps like Gates and Buffet.

These shadowy figures do however turn up at Davos with plenty of others for camouflage like the Cluneys who can usefully deflect press attention from the Divas.

So what I was referring to in my earlier post was not so much about the warnings of CEOs but the real warnings from the ‘Divas’ of which we shall never ever hear a thing.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:17 PM CEST

-> tpk

My feeling is that May is now stronger than before. Only now she can start to act a bit more freely how she likes. Common sense might get a chance to trickle in the discussion about Brexit. I am afraid not so much in public (the white paper is of course nonsense), but in Brussels. It would be very healthy for UK of course if the whole discussion would become more down to earth.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:17 PM CEST

Peter Monta

It isn’t quite over yet tpk but basically I agree with both you and Francois P. Anybody with a basic grasp of economics and trade could see that not only was no deal better than a bad deal, no deal was absolutely the worst deal. But the impacts of not having a deal is so completely asymmetrical between what would be spread over the many nations of the EU and what would hit the UK that the UK’s negotiating position was incredibly weak. So it remains.

Ireland was truly a spectacular example of ostrich head hiding. Not our problem, your problem say the Brexiters. We demand an invisible border that anybody or anything can cross! So we can have control of our own borders!

To me the most amazing thing is that nobody on the Brexit side seemed to foresee any difficulties at all when but a few seconds of thought would have produced hundreds of “what about” questions.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:25 PM CEST

blue bell

@Irene Duym
“Well, Cameron should be held responsible and handle the hurdle: as a coward, he decided to resign instead and leave the mess for others to deal with.”

Well Irene as a woman I would have thought you would already know that it was ever the case that men make a mess and women have to clean up – it has been the way of the world since time immemorial! You are a woman aren’t you?

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:28 PM CEST

blue bell

@Peter Monta
“To me the most amazing thing is that nobody on the Brexit side seemed to foresee any difficulties at all when but a few seconds of thought would have produced hundreds of “what about” questions.”

Oh Peter, if only we Brits had thought to employ your services we could all be sitting here eating cakes and cherries.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:34 PM CEST

X KM

blue bell
Oh Peter, if only we Brits had thought to employ your services we could all be sitting here eating cakes and cherries.
——-
“sitting here eating cakes and cherries” simply doing nothing and eating cakes and cherries, perhaps not (That is what the Brexetears dream about). But being part of the EU and sharing in the benefits it brings for sure.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:44 PM CEST

Irene Duym

@blue bell
In this case, she accepted to clean the mess because she her personal ambitions led her to believe she could hope for consideration and reward….. Big mistake: she should have left the mess to someone else..;-)

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:50 PM CEST

blue bell

@X KM
“being part of the EU and sharing in the benefits it brings for sure.”

In your dreams mein mürrischer Bär!

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:53 PM CEST

-> tpk

@Peter Monta

“To me the most amazing thing is that nobody on the Brexit side seemed to foresee any difficulties at all when but a few seconds of thought would have produced hundreds of “what about” questions.”

Once heard of an experiment where a completely naked woman drove to a gas station from an old man in a very conservative area. They later asked him if he observed anything strange about the woman. No he said. The explanation was that a naked woman was so far out of his paradigm that he could simply not perceive that.

I could never believe this story was really true but with the Brexiteers something similar must be going on. Their paradigm of EU always being the bad guy is so deeply rooted in them, plus the arguments repeated in an echo camper made them water proof to any rational arguments. Really amazing.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:53 PM CEST

blue bell

@Irene Duym
“Irene Duym
@blue bell
In this case, she accepted to clean the mess because she her personal ambitions led her to believe she could hope for consideration and reward….. Big mistake: she should have left the mess to someone else..;-)”

… but when she is lieutenant material and not general material what other chance would she have ever had to get the top post?

Posted on 7/10/18 | 4:57 PM CEST

edel .

Agree with @Irene Duym on May.

There is a old legend in my original land about a zombie-like figure that leads a group of people during the night and the only scape she has is to find someone to take her position… I had never believed much on those old stories told by my grandma… and then Brexit came along!

@Tony Brown, you even said it; “hard line brexiteers”, not brexiteers. It is normal that the most extreme factions are the loudest but rarely they kidnap the entire process. And when they do, it seldom ends well.

Norway had a similar referendum (twice) yet they are quite happy with having the closest position to an actual membership. Don’t take me wrong, hard brexit is as valid option as any other, what is not normal is how a brexit referendum with a small margin has been taken by a small group of MPs disregarding the rest of paralyzed MPs. Hey, good for those highly motivated MPs and shame on the quiet majority, but please, don’t say the all the 52% of voters wants a hard brexit, specially now that are far more informed than in 2016. And, if in doubt in this critical matter, go to the polls again and be more specific this time around.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 5:46 PM CEST

Grazyna Krakowska

I don’t see how the Europhobes in May’s caucus will continue to support her if she agrees to a soft Brexit. The consequences of a soft Brexit will mean Britain will still follow many EU economic and trade rules, but will no longer have a say in drafting or amending them because its seats in the European Parliament will be vacated.

Once the British public realises this, support for May and Brexit will plummet.

Brexit will be a gift to Vladimir Putin. The EU and NATO were both designed in part to counter Russia’s economic and military influences in Europe, respectively.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 5:57 PM CEST

Just an EU guy

Just a lot of noise. UK is strying to spin is proposition as a hard-won compromise, a “soft” Brexit. Same shxt, different shape.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 6:06 PM CEST

Just an EU guy

@Edel ” And, if in doubt in this critical matter, go to the polls again and be more specific this time around.”

The last thing those “democrats” want is another election, or another vote.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 6:10 PM CEST

blue bell

@Grazyna Krakowska
“The Brexit referendum isn’t legally binding under British law, and it was only an advisory vote. If May loses her premiership, there is no guarantee that the Brexit process will continue.

I don’t believe a Labour government would continue the process.”

It is true that the Referendum was only advisory but that changed when it was put before Parliament.

If May loses her premiership the time will still tick away and the UK will be out.

The Labour party under its current leadership and its associates would decimate this country if they were to get into power.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 6:11 PM CEST

Grazyna Krakowska

@François P.

The headline is a reference to undead creatures. A zombie is a dead person who has been reanimated. Thus, Politico is implying May is a dead woman walking. The Americans have a similar term <>, which is a politician who knows she is on the verge of defeat and is using her time until her replacement is seated to get as much done without consequence to the next election.

I suspect public for support for May will crumble once the British know they will still be bound by many EU laws but won’t have the ability to give input on them any longer.

I give May until September at the latest.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 6:13 PM CEST

Grazyna Krakowska

@blue bell:

While Brexit was codified by parliament, the law could still be repealed if MPs change their minds or a new government is formed before the process is complete.

It is not out of the realm of possibility that May loses a confidence vote after Britain realises her plan would bind her to following many EU policies but would lose its ability to have a say in them.

If an election were held tomorrow, I bet Corbyn would win due to the sharp divisions held by Tories on her policy. Labour is currently more unified on most policy.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 6:22 PM CEST

blue bell

“Two of Tory vice chairs, Ben Bradley and Maria Caulfield, are quitting in protest at Chequers plan,” Kuenssberg said on Twitter.

“You may well not have heard of them but it’s warning from disgruntled Tories that they are capable of continuing to inflict damage on the PM unless she changes tack.”

They are said to be furious with JRM and his set over their aim of trying to change Mrs May’s policy rather than trigger a vote.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 7:21 PM CEST

Donal O'Brien

Att Comment

Today in the USA
Barnier said we the EU @ BRITAIN have agreed 80% of the BREXIT Negotiations ?
We have 20% left to discuss which we hope to discuss START NEXT WEEK
When we should also have the WHITE PAPER

All of sudden Major change so in other words
Yes they had been making HUGE progress unbeknownst to everyone only BARNIER

Ya see what Theresa May can do when she goes to see FUHRER MERKEL and outlines to Her how and what She will be doing at CHEQUERS
Also informing Her she would be first to receive a copy of WHITE PAPER before anyone else in the Cabinet

Going back to BARRIERS Who up to last week before MAY saw Fuhrer Merkle
had very little good news to pass to Joe Soap the Tax Paying European especially the BRITS

Anyway im sure before the Week is Out tis more Wagons and Strange going on we’ll be talking about

Cheers for Brexit
Allways
Donal O’Brien

Posted on 7/10/18 | 11:18 PM CEST

Cheeky NumberTwo

As JRM warned, the current path outlined by May could lead to a top down split in the Conservative party. It is not out of the realms of possibility that 45-50 Conservative MPs decamp to UKIP, forming a kingmaker party under the leadership of Sir Nigel of Farage.
No deal – or in effect a WTO deal – would then be the only deal available to the EU. As would be made clear, it wouldn’t be “soft” brexit or “hard” brexit, it would just be brexit, and is exactly what 17.2 million people voted for.

The support from the electorate would be there for a new party of politicians who actually delivered what they promised, and would signal the end of the Labour-lite Conservative party we are currently stuck with.

I’d vote for them – I’d probably even join them as a member.

Posted on 7/10/18 | 11:39 PM CEST

Joke V

Sometime I just think I must be a few years older than all of you . The times they then already were a’ changing

Posted on 7/11/18 | 12:21 AM CEST

Grazyna Krakowska

55% of UKIP voters left school aged 16 or younger.

Doesn’t say much about their capacity for understanding European history and political needs.

Posted on 7/11/18 | 4:15 AM CEST

Alex T

@ Grazyna “from Krakau”

“f 50 Tory MPs switched to UKIP, May would lose a confidence vote and Labour would probably win. Polls currently have Labour with a lead.”

It is one single poll, that by Survation, that puts Labour ahead. And we all know how unreliable polls have proved to be.

55% of UKIP voters left school aged 16 or younger.
Doesn’t say much about their capacity for understanding European history and political needs.”

Your comments show only that you are seriously challenged intelectually.

Posted on 7/11/18 | 12:37 PM CEST

Alex T

*intellectually

Posted on 7/11/18 | 12:37 PM CEST

blue bell

@François P
It increasingly appears that there will be no leadership challenge. May remains in the saddle in a far stronger position.

The question is whose colours is she wearing?

Posted on 7/11/18 | 6:10 PM CEST

Stiv Ocssor

@blue bell

The UK needs a law that automatically triggers a general election when the government acts in such a gross manner.
May has effectively turned our Parliament in to a rubber stamp Parliament whilst betraying a national mandate and her parties manifesto and there is nothing we the people can do about it.
Conservative MPs must oust that despicable PM or they will hang with her in the next general election.

Posted on 7/12/18 | 10:09 PM CEST


Click here to open external link

Theresa May, Britain’s zombie prime minister